My Take On the Election

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Re: My Take On the Election

Postby met on Sun Nov 13, 2016 7:39 pm

Yes, that's an ongoing problem. .... Henry Ford, not an otherwise enlightened guy, said he paid his workers enough so they could afford to buy the cars they were making. Aren't corporations really working against their own long-term interests?.


:(

According to my first year economic courses ..... probly not? Strong macroeconomic flows do require SOME participation, but not as much as you might think - can work well and even be maximized with only somewhere around 20-25% participation, i.e. with a relatively small bourgeois class. This macroeconomic theory is related to the microeconomic idea that luxury goods are the most profitable - eg GM does better making the same profits from Cadillacs than cheaper vehicles because of wear and tear on factories, etc.

... but I don't know if anyone has repudiated or contested that theory more recently or if economics students are taught that today.

Another factor that is mentioned, in the Fast-Data Age, managers and executives end up being narrowly focused on quarterly bottom lines, often at the expense longer term planning, since the response to a "bad quarter' or two can be so dramatic? Ie the current rate of technological/structural change is scary, even for the investment crowd.
The “One” is the space of the “world” of the tick, but also the “pinch” of the lobster, or that rendezvous in person to confirm online pictures (with a new lover or an old God). This is the machinery operative...as “onto-theology."
Dr Ward Blanton
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Re: My Take On the Election

Postby Jim B. on Mon Nov 14, 2016 4:08 am

met wrote:
Yes, that's an ongoing problem. .... Henry Ford, not an otherwise enlightened guy, said he paid his workers enough so they could afford to buy the cars they were making. Aren't corporations really working against their own long-term interests?.


:(

According to my first year economic courses ..... probly not? Strong macroeconomic flows do require SOME participation, but not as much as you might think - can work well and even be maximized with only somewhere around 20-25% participation, i.e. with a relatively small bourgeois class. This macroeconomic theory is related to the microeconomic idea that luxury goods are the most profitable - eg GM does better making the same profits from Cadillacs than cheaper vehicles because of wear and tear on factories, etc.

... but I don't know if anyone has repudiated or contested that theory more recently or if economics students are taught that today.

Another factor that is mentioned, in the Fast-Data Age, managers and executives end up being narrowly focused on quarterly bottom lines, often at the expense longer term planning, since the response to a "bad quarter' or two can be so dramatic? Ie the current rate of technological/structural change is scary, even for the investment crowd.


met, has this trend to focus on the next quarterly report been increasing? I remember when Lee Iacocca led a US delegation of business leaders to Japan for some kind of business summit, maybe in hte late 80's, that it was reported that the Japanese business leaders viewed Iacocca et al with some disdain. They referred to iacocca and his ilk as "merchants," ie myopic and not playing the long game.
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